One Simple Thing You Can Do Today To Become a Great Leader

Frida-cry-for-love

If your actions inspire others to dream more

To do more

To become more

Then you are a leader

John Quincy Adams

Close your eyes for a minute and think of the people in your life who did that for you?  How did they make you feel?

We’ll all describe this slightly differently but I can guess they had time for you – you felt special, they had wisdom – you listened to them, they believed in you – and you felt safe.

I know these people are special and memorable

And they’re rare – you can probably count them off on one hand

In business; my experience is that these leaders are the exception not the norm. I would like to be able to think this isn’t the case. I wasn’t born a great leader and it’s taken me a very long time to understand what it is and what it is not and put it into action.

I think like in a family, if we lack good role models, if we not shown the way – we do not know the way – some of us will eventually work it out for ourselves and come to good leadership.

Some of us never will – you know who you are, we know who you are.

I think although we know a lot of about leadership, we are still not producing great leaders or great role models as the norm.

And that’s a massive problem in my opinion

Victor Lipman in a recent Forbes article Why are So Many Employee Disengagedcites a study by Dale Carnegie Training that placed the number of  US “fully engaged” employees at 29%, and “disengaged” employees at 26% – if this is correct then nearly three-quarters of employees are not fully engaged.

And the number one factor the study cited influencing engagement and disengagement was “relationship with immediate supervisor.”

Why? Why should this relationship matter to much us? 

We have expectations of our leaders, just as we do with our parents and I don’t think many leaders/managers fully understand this psychological contract.

And they do not understand the responsibility that comes with the position.

Let’s go back to what we were talking about earlier – how good leaders make us feel. Why do good leaders make us feel that way and why is it significant?

In our personal lives we learn the difference between good and bad friendships. A good relationship should make you feel happy, confident, inspired, open to communicating and free to be you = safe. A good relationship should not make you feel insecure, unsafe, second guessing and/or afraid to speak up.

Karen Salmonsohn in her blog Signs Your In a Great Relationship talks about Jim Collins book, Good To Great. She explains that one of the most important qualities necessary to grow a company from “good to great” is the ability to speak “harsh truth” — be a “front-stabber,” as she likes to say.

Harsh-truth-speaking is the only way a company can gain needed blind-spot insights— what’s holding it back from greatness.

 Harsh-truth-speaking is essential to growth, companies that are run by nice, empathic, trust-worthy bosses tend to be the ones which grow from “good to great” —because employees are less afraid to harsh-truth-speak to them.

There’s that safety thing again.

Simon Sineck’s talks a lot about safety, Why Good Leaders Make You Feel Safe(check out the TED Talk). He makes many analogies about being a great parent and a great leader. These leaders build a culture of trust and  co-operation in their teams and organisations.  They give love and respect, clear boundaries, they believing in others and support them to do their best.

Your never second guessing with these leaders, they give you feedback, you know where you are – always.

Transparency isn’t overrated

I think a lot about sport and the dichotomy between what we as players or fans expect from our sports teams and what we put up with in a working environment.

I was reminded of this watching Sunday afternoon the American cultural phenomenon – football. San Diego vs Denver. I vaguely know each team gets 4 go’s at making 10 meters – the ultimate goal being a touchdown and a conversion. Every person has a position and a role to play in the team.   Your only to make any ground if you have a game play and you play as a team.

Can you imagine if team members competed with each other to get the ball? Had cliques and favourites – only passed to some and not others? What if you never took time to review the game play, what if feedback wasn’t given to team members and team members ganged on others and blamed them?

This is so farcical in a sporting sense yet so common place in our organisations.

And if we are going to call ourselves leaders, creating a culture of trust and co-operation in our teams and our organisations start with us.

“If you are going to be the best that you can be, you are going to have to front up, and get it sorted. Knowing what you want, and being prepared to fight for it puts you at the front of the pack. Fronting up becomes more important precisely as it becomes harder … that is what makes you successful. You have to decide whether to take the easy option or take the tough, sometimes painful road. My choice? Front up. Every time. This is me, and this is who I am. This is what I stand for, and this is my life. I will front up. You have a simple choice. You have to decide. Do you stand up or step aside? To be the best that you can be, front up.”

 Sean Fitzpatrick – Former All Black Captain

So what is the one simple thing you can do today to become a great leader?

Take one action and do one thing today to make your team or individuals to feel safe 

RINSE AND REPEAT 

Stepping Out Of the Dark To Agile

Frida-Fridakahlo-Endure-Muchmore-Wethinkwecan-Cats-Meow-Skulls-Goodnight-Quote- (1)

We
So tired of all the darkness in our lives
With no more angry words to say
Can come alive
Get into a car and drive
To the other side

Getting to the other side of Agile is hard and wouldn’t it be great to get into a car and simply drive there.

Yes siree

I’ve talked about metaphors, Slow Boats to China. I look back and I think helping a team become Agile is one of the hardest things you can do. Here are some of my reflections

You’ll See Some Early Success 

Gartner talks about a Hype cycle in change projects. Initially there is high visibility and great expectations and excitement. You see energy, creativity and transparency and teaming. It feels like a high – your in a flow state.  The agile systems and practices help, the scrum process, daily stand-ups and the social contract all work in concert with one another provided you have as a key condition team members who are positive willing and committed.

You see early wins and everyone agrees it’s been a great success.

Focused on the right conditions, the freedom to decide the work is done, with no obvious roadblocks and with taciturn permission to get things done with a sense of urgency we should be set up right?

Right? Like No…

We expect to repeat those early wins over and over again but as we have reach the peak of inflated expectations and the team starts to learn what it really means to be transparent, what rigour and effort has to go into inspection and adaption – it can become confusing.

The upholding of the social contract and holding each other to account, can result in team members confronting deep mental models based on traditional thinking – it can be very uncomfortable. No one has asked this of them before and you will see people grappling, resisting or embracing this in their own way and time.

And Some Failures Don’t Mean We Are Failing   

Productivity and throughput will stall as the team is still forming. Add new team members during the early stages of forming can add additional complexity particularly if they don’t have previous agile exposure. Maybe the second and third sprints were a bit of fail, maybe you didn’t work on the high value work, or you were coming to grips with the whole sprint planning process and backlog – all this playing out against a back drop a team forming and probably storming.

Still …we fondly remember that first sprint and expect seeing results like right now and when we don’t get them we might denounce the team, or even abandon our transformation efforts as a failure or talk about derailment. We think of the high we achieved and we yearn for the flow state. We keep chasing the dragon

Show People What They Need to See to Understand  

Maybe the rest of the organisation isn’t agile and you’re an agile pocket. You work iteratively – biting off slices of the elephant that you need to transform – they work waterfall and expect to see large detailed plans. You show them the roadmap, how the backlog draws from the roadmap, the backlog is visible for everyone to see and you tell them what you’re working on in this Sprint. They’re still not comfortable maybe they’ll express they can’t understand the bigger picture, you show them the roadmap again, and the epics in the backlog – you give them a gaant chart. Their happy

In the early stages of adoption you’ll see the team naturally forming, ebbing and flowing and commonly there’s several storms, you might see the team break every single element of the social contract. This is where Agile frontloads every defect, hang up, insecurity and our true mental models are exposed. It’s in your face and you cannot hide. At this point you might see some natural self-selection as people decide Agile isn’t for them.

The coaching dynamic can change here too. Another much more experienced coach  told me the team he was working with, screwed up all the backlog items and chucked them in the bin. Try not to take this too personally.

Lyssa Adkins reminds us that we cannot coach anyone if their feet are pointed away from you and instead go where your wanted. Focus on those individuals in the team that do want it and are close to crossing over into the agile mind-set. You can build up this coalition of agilists and build the core strength of the team to help the others.

Getting to Agile Takes Time – It’s No Magic Instant Fix

Agile isn’t just a new process or methodology, but a completely different ideology–a different way of experiencing and being. Steve Denning says instead of an ideology of control with a focus on efficiency and predictability and detailed plans and internal focus, it’s an ideology of enablement, with a focus on self-organization, continuous improvement, an iterative approach. This takes time and practice.

Teams that may have early success can think they have mastered Shu (follow the rules) and move too quickly into Ha (break the rules). Things can regress pretty quickly and spectacularly in this context and disillusion can set it

And a shift in ideology isn’t a little fix.

Having Clarity of Roles is Key

Scrum has three roles. The Scrum Master, The Team and The Product Owner. A self-managing team especially in the early stages of adoption doesn’t mean they are equipped to prioritise their own backlog. We underestimated the role of the PO to provide that clarity and delegating the role to a peer in the team, didn’t work either because in this case the delegated PO was also a team member which resulted on context switching and role confusion. Looking back a simple mistake based on traditional thinking. It’s been cool though to see one team member step up and really flourish as a new Scrum Master and understand this role is more than running a stand up.

You’ll Need to Be Really Persistent 

Starting Agile is hard, really hard. The first few sprints might fall flat but that does not mean it’s not working. Not repeating those early successes doesn’t mean its failed. You will cock up sprint planning and work on the wrong things, you will make mistakes and slip back into traditional thinking. But if you are dedicated and persistent, you will get to the goal (and that goal far exceeds any losses/failures along the way). Denning says when the team really lands a sprint and has break through results when they get that first successful project, it is the same as Alexander Graham Bell inventing the telephone or Thomas Edison turning on the first light bulb.”

Choose Your Agile Partners Carefully 

There is a lot of people calling themselves Agile Coaches and not a lot of understanding of the role of an Agile Coach. Sometimes used interchangeably with a project manager.  Choosing your Agile partner is really important. My husband recently spent over 3 months carefully considering who he would partner with. The Agile Coach needs to have the experience but the type of person you are certain will leave the team in a better place.

Sometimes too you see a thin Agile veneer laid on top of traditional corporate hierarchy. In these cases, sometimes organisations are doing what they’ve always done; they’re just now calling it ‘Agile.’” It fails to deliver and then Agile is blamed. This makes me sad and maybe a little mad

But when you as a team make it through the difficult transition period, take the ideology and mindset to heart, and implement it on a consistent basis, not merely adding a veneer of words, then you will get the kind of results that make the slow boat worth it.

We
Are young but getting old before our time
We’ll leave the T.V. and the radio behind
Don’t you wonder what we’ll find
Steppin’ out tonight

Agile Bal Masqué

Mask

To the people

In the new world

Haven’t you heard

Everybody’s got a great life

We’re living in the blur

Tokio Hotel

After almost a year of being lost in an parallel space and time continuum of an Agile Transformation – I’ve learnt many things, Of most importance to me?

That Agile means different things to different people.

For some, agile means adopting ‘proper’ Scrum, working in iterations, daily inspection, adaption and transparency, collaboration and team work. For others, it can mean the waterfall-style development,with some aspects of the ceremonies and practices such as daily stand-up meetings.

I have definitely become less of a ‘purist’ when considering adopting agile outside of software development than working with development or project teams. I sense its somewhere between Shu and Ha in this operational context of agile transformation. Subsequently I’ve become obsessed with spotting Agile anti-patterns.

I’ve made many mistakes – the consolation is that this is supposed to be normal.

I hope you can learn from mine.

In your agile adoption or transformation journey, when this becomes unbalanced, you will experience and see some obvious symptoms.

If your approach is very process orientated with strict adherence to the Scrum processes with less emphasis on say transparency, team work and collaboration you probably won’t have a happy or high performing team but you’ll get some stuff done.

Inversely if you choose to adopt only some of the practices and ceremonies and focus on collaboration for example but aren’t inspecting and adapting with transparency then I think you could end up with a variation of agile which isn’t ‘pure’ Agile.

And does that really matter in the end?

Regardless of where you stand in this continuum, to be an Agile organisation or business unit I’ve formed the view that you need to have the right balance of Agile strategy, mind-set – people, interactions, behaviors, culture and processes, practices and tools for you. 

Different strokes suit different folks.

I think this is particularly relevant to Agile in an operational context.

After all, as long as you have some sort of agility it makes sense, doesn’t it? Who wouldn’t want their organisation or their change initiative to be more agile?

Scrum & Agile

Let’s revisit what Scrum is and its importance to Agile.

Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland developed Scrum. The Scrum Guide describes Scrum as a framework where teams can address complex adaptive problems, while productively and creatively delivering products of the highest possible value.

Scrum as a framework is lightweight, simple to understand but difficult to master. Edwin Dando has talked about this with me many times – I now well understand what he means.

“The Scrum framework consists of Scrum Teams and their associated roles, events, artefacts, and rules. Each component within the framework serves a specific purpose and is essential to Scrum’s success and usage. The rules of Scrum bind together the events, roles, and artefacts, governing the relationships and interaction between them”.

Each component within the framework serves a specific purpose and is essential to Scrum’s success and usage

And so common is it for Agile teams to find themselves skipping over the key components that it’s got its own term and Wikipedia definition – Wagile. Agile + Waterfall = Wagile.

“….that result from slipping from agile back into waterfall, doing a lot of short waterfalls and thinking it is agile”  

I think Scrum is an important framework and I’ve seen broad adherence as well as a more looser interpretation. The loose interpretations I used to freak out about. I’ve become more comfortable with the looser approach to method because I’ve also seen that the agile mindset and ways of working – do work!

And what can you do in the future to ensure you stay on track with your Agile Transformation journey with an approach that works for you? What’s important to consider?

Recruit for Agile Mindset/Experience

You can recruit for this and it’s critical that you do. You might get push back that it doesn’t really matter. You can teach any framework but it’s much harder and takes a long time to teach Agile mindset. Perhaps you’ve inherited the team or new people have joined. Induction and expectation setting then takes on real importance    

Agile Working – What’s Importance to Us?

Being really clear about Agile – what it is, what it means, how you experience it and see it. Taking the time to explain that the principles behind say your stand ups or your planning process. What does “Team” mean and what it feels like when everyone is collaborating? How is the way we work different for an individual not familiar with Agile concepts? How does this play out day to day?

Be Really Clear on Delegation

Delegation can work differently in Agile environments. For new managers joining an Agile environment this can be confusing. Scrum is clear about the relative roles and responsibility of the PO, SM and Team. Jurgen Appelos “Delegation Poker” is good for any new manager, functional lead or team member joining an Agile environment.

What is the Role Of The Manager in Agile?  

As with delegation, being clear and discussing what the role is and what it is not in Agile is super important. Does it mean consulting the team but making the final decisions? Or is it about facilitating a high performing team and what does that look like? While a manager isn’t in the Scrum team in that role, sometimes in operations a manager may also do work in the team but take that hat off.

Be Sure to Explain Where You Are & How You Got Here 

Agile is a journey and if you are moving from a traditional to Agile environment where individuals are typically signed off on their work, to a more collaborative, team oriented process, it’s vital to factor this into your Agile transition plan.

It takes time and coaching and effort. And be aware that it’s going to take more than just or two sprints for your team(s) to find their groove. Because, in the end, Agile is far more than a process change – it’s a game-changer for the entire business.

Over a 6 – 12 month period I would view as the foundation layer, learning and making mistakes, things won’t be perfect – and it is really important to be able to tell the story of that journey and the changes that have happened.

Because without this any one new cannot appreciate or understand what has gone before, what you have learned and how you got to today. Your unpicking at scale a hundred years of management practices and notions of how work can be done.

Self-Managing Teams Don’t Just Happen   

I used to believe that teams would just self-manage to the level to what I expected them to. This was naive. A team can be engaged but may not able to self manage say to the level of dev team because of relevant levels of expertise. Outside of software development you get into to notions of relevancy. So being able to self manage to the level of capability of that team and be realistic about the level of coaching support and guidelines needed.

David Marquet showed us In “Turn the Ship Around” to give the team the keys to ship without a gradual release of delegation aligned to competency will result in confusion and failure.

Agile Is Not For Everyone  

Some peoples brains are not wired that way and despite your best efforts won’t change. Help them find something fulfilling satisfactory elsewhere.

Transition Will Cause Resistance

I believe you cannot manage change, you can only help navigate it. There are too many variables. Naturally is it not going to be all smooth sailing, your changing their world and long held belief systems. Some people will just plain not like it,

Agile Isn’t A Silver Bullet 

Agile is not magic. We can’t produce something from nothing or make other trade-offs go away.  You can’t expect to maintain the status quo AND improve. It’s simply not the “real world.” You cannot a team to become self-managing overnight. You might not see any improvement to performance quickly because your Agile programme aligns at a point of time to balance the longer term with the now. And then you’ll see results. The trick is knowing what point that is and ensuring alignment to that point,

To me Agile is all about embracing the uncertainty of change and learning how to use it to your advantage.

And becoming Agile means being open to possibilities and options.

Being Agile is understanding what innovation truly means in the same sense that an artist understands what “creativity” means.

I can explain the values, principles, practices, and dynamics of agile culture to someone, but I can’t tell them how to be innovative.

That’s something that has to come from within – the want to be truly great, to be better than you ever thought possible.

It’s uncomfortable, change.

And, through discomfort, we learn and grow.

Stepping Out Of The Dark – Into Agile

Frida-Fridakahlo-Endure-Muchmore-Wethinkwecan-Cats-Meow-Skulls-Goodnight-Quote- (1)

We
So tired of all the darkness in our lives
With no more angry words to say
Can come alive
Get into a car and drive
To the other side

Getting to the other side of Agile is hard and I wish we could get into a car and simply drive there.

I wrote this 6 months ago and talked about metaphors, Slow Boats to China. I look back and I think helping a team cross over to Agile is one of the hardest things you can do.

Early Success

Gartner talks about a Hype cycle in change projects. Initially there is high visibility and great expectations and excitement. You see energy, creativity and transparency and teaming. It feels like a high – your in a flow state.  The agile systems and practices help, the scrum process, daily stand-ups and the social contract all work in concert with one another provided you have as a key condition team members who are positive willing and committed.

You see early wins and everyone agrees it’s been a great success.

Focused on the right conditions, the freedom to decide the work is done, with no obvious roadblocks and with taciturn permission to get things done with a sense of urgency we should be set up right?

Right? Like No…

We expect to repeat those early wins over and over again but as we have reach the peak of inflated expectations and the team starts to learn what it really means to be transparent, what rigour and effort has to go into inspection and adaption – it can become confusing.

The upholding of the social contract and holding each other to account, can result in team members confronting deep mental models based on traditional thinking – it can be very uncomfortable. No one has asked this of them before and you will see people grappling, resisting or embracing this in their own way and time.

Productivity and throughput will stall as the team is still forming. Add new team members during the early stages of forming can add additional complexity particularly if they don’t have previous agile exposure. Maybe the second and third sprints were a bit of fail, maybe you didn’t work on the high value work, or you were coming to grips with the whole sprint planning process and backlog – all this playing out against a back drop a team forming and probably storming.

Still …we fondly remember that first sprint and expect seeing results like right now and when we don’t get them we might denounce the team, or even abandon our transformation efforts as a failure or talk about derailment. We think of the high we achieved and we yearn for the flow state. We keep chasing the dragon

Maybe the rest of the organisation isn’t agile and you’re an agile pocket. You work iteratively – biting off slices of the elephant that you need to transform – they work waterfall and expect to see large detailed plans. You show them the roadmap, how the backlog draws from the roadmap, the backlog is visible for everyone to see and you tell them what you’re working on in this Sprint. They’re still not comfortable maybe they’ll express they can’t understand the bigger picture, you show them the roadmap again, and the epics in the backlog – you give them a gaant chart. Their happy

In the early stages of adoption you’ll see the team naturally forming, ebbing and flowing and commonly there’s several storms, you might see the team break every single element of the social contract. This is where Agile frontloads every defect, hang up, insecurity and our true mental models are exposed. It’s in your face and you cannot hide. At this point you might see some natural self-selection as people decide Agile isn’t for them.

The coaching dynamic can change here too. Another much more experienced coach  told me the team he was working with, screwed up all the backlog items and chucked them in the bin. Try not to take this too personally.

Lyssa Adkins reminds us that we cannot coach anyone if their feet are pointed away from you and instead go where your wanted. Focus on those individuals in the team that do want it and are close to crossing over into the agile mind-set. You can build up this coalition of agilists and build the core strength of the team to help the others.

Getting to Agile Takes Time – It’s No Magic Instant Fix

Agile isn’t just a new process or methodology, but a completely different ideology –a different way of experiencing and being. Steve Denning says instead of an ideology of control with a focus on efficiency and predictability and detailed plans and internal focus, it’s an ideology of enablement, with a focus on self-organization, continuous improvement, an iterative approach. This takes time and practice.

Teams that may have early success can think they have mastered Shu (follow the rules) and move too quickly into Ha (break the rules). Things regress pretty quickly and spectacularly in this context and disillusion can set it

And a shift in ideology isn’t a little fix.

Having Clarity of Roles is Key

Scrum has three roles. The Scrum Master, The Team and The Product Owner. A self-managing team especially in the early stages of adoption doesn’t mean they are equipped to prioritise their own backlog. We underestimated the role of the PO to provide that clarity and delegating the role to a peer in the team, didn’t work either because in this case the delegated PO was also a team member which resulted on context switching and role confusion. Looking back a simple mistake based on traditional thinking. It’s been cool though to see one team member step up and really flourish as a new Scrum Master and understand this role is more than running a stand up.

Be Persistent

Starting Agile is hard, really hard. The first few sprints might fall flat but that does not mean it’s not working. Not repeating those early successes doesn’t mean its failed. You will cock up sprint planning and work on the wrong things, you will make mistakes and slip back into traditional thinking. But if you are dedicated and persistent, you will get to the goal (and that goal far exceeds any losses/failures along the way). Denning says when the team really lands a sprint and has break through results when they get that first successful project, it is the same as Alexander Graham Bell inventing the telephone or Thomas Edison turning on the first light bulb.”

Beware of Agile Imitations

I’ve seen a lot of thin Agile veneer laid on top of traditional corporate hierarchy and politics.” In these cases, organisations are doing what they’ve always done; they’re just now calling it ‘Agile.’” It fails to deliver and then Agile is blamed. This makes me sad and maybe a little mad

But when you as a team make it through the difficult transition period, rebuild trust take the ideology to heart, and implement it on a consistent basis, not merely adding a veneer of words, then you will get the kind of results that make the slow boat worth it.

We
Are young but getting old before our time
We’ll leave the T.V. and the radio behind
Don’t you wonder what we’ll find
Steppin’ out tonight

We Are Done

Frida

I want you to know
It’s time to go
Yeah we are done
I want you to see
That I need  to be free

HRMANZ  (Up the Down Escalator) inspired this blog; stemming from his excellent article Walking Towards the Light.

There has been much talk lately in the HR community being at a cross roads – and debate about what this means.

Lets be be  more commercial! more business focused! its about results and bottom line!  That will fix it!  I don’t doubt these things are a core competency for anyone in business – but if this is where we think we’ll get our redemption – then we are done.

I used to think singularly about driving for results, bottom lines and managing the people. That was my job

But I forgot that work is a complex social organisation with individuals and groups of people – work is not a thing. I forgot that as people we have an instrinsic desire for self determination,self actualisation and creativity.

Its why we aren’t lizards. I forgot that.

I forgot that my role as a manager wasn’t about managing the people – because deep down people dont like to be ‘managed’ it dumbs us down – we like to think for ourselves.

But I was too busy – I had results to achieve!

I forgot to support the people to own their own work and outcomes, to decide for themselves how they achieved it and that I would work with them collaboratively to set the goals and the timeframes.

I forgot to cultivate a workplace where failing fast was ok and where curiosity and learning was priceless.

But I was far too busy managing the people, recoverables and measuring the productivity

I forgot that employee engagement came from facilitating a work environment where peoples instrinsic needs for self determination, creativity, problem solving and self actualisation were met – not through engagement surveys where I would try to then fix the ‘problem’ without really understanding the real problem lay systemically with the way we were organised to do the work.

But I was too busy managing KPIs and performance.

I forgot that managing a ‘poor’ performer was in most cases actually my failure

But I was too busy setting performance improvement objectives

Really I sucked

As an HR person I prided myself on having deep commercial acumen and understanding the financials.

But I forgot about the people – I may have left them behind the fridge. I set policies and procedures that were compliance and risk focused – but I forgot about the people – I was too busy being a hard arsed business she-warrior

Now I am neither a manager or a traditional HR person – I am a change agent, design thinker, creative networker and I am focused on agile culture and the new practices of Holocracy, agile leadership and servant leadership.

These principles throw on its head our management structures, beliefs, styles which are based on 100 year old military notions of pyramid command and control, where we assume that the people at the top are best qualified to make decisions,where leadership is really follow ‘me’.

This is what I believe to the core of my being

Focus on the people – you’ll deliver great customer experience

Focus on the people – you’ll deliver great products

Focus on the people – you’ll deliver profits

HR and line management is ALL about the people – if you focus on the people, focus on provding the best employee experience (EXD), combined with working on the right things with the right leadership through all levels of the organisation then this will result in the right results.

You – line managers – if all you do every day is show your people what good and done looks like, remove barriers and give your people what they need to work it out for themselves – how they get the work done – then your a legend

If we just employed people to be really good people, what value would that add to the business? It would be priceless and we would all be rich !! Look at Zappos, Google, Base Camp, Vend & Xero

What I think is fundamentally wrong with HR and line management leadership is that we are still trying to make stuff happen within organisations that are systemically wired based on 100 year old operating models. I’ve blogged about this before – its like putting water into a car – its just not going to go.

So here is the challenge for HR and line managers– understand the systemic nature of organisations, look at companies like Zappos and Google and Nitrix and understand how they are different, understand deeply the psychological and social nature of work, critically examine how work is structured and how gets done – understand the why businesses MUST be employee centric and why the new HR is a design thinker, systemic thinker, organisational architect, business consultant and work psychologist

He aha te mea nui o te ao? He tangata! He tangata! He tangata!

What is the most important thing in the world? It is people! It is people! It is people!